Walhallavagen

Just an ordinary girl's life

Tag: studyblr

Duolingo + Index Card Workflow

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I’ve been working with this kind of setup for a while now, and since it has served me well I thought I would share it here.

I discovered soon enough that I wasn’t making many progresses by practicing Duolingo skills the traditional way. This is the kind of problem I’ve had with spaced repetition systems in the past as well – they work great at first but after a while they become a bit dry and my retention rate starts dropping significantly.

Active recalling is always best than passive memorisation, so whenever I can I try to follow this simple but much more effective system for both Chinese and Japanese:

  1. I create an index card for each single skill than I want to work on. On the top left I write ‘C Duolingo’ or ‘J Duolingo’ so that I can distinguish between the two languages, while on the top right I write the name of the specific skill I’m practicing (Activity 1, Food 3 and so on)
  2. on the index card, I write in English all those sentences I would like to try and actively remember
  3. I keep adding all new sentences as you usually don’t encounter them all at once

This is what may be considered the preparation phase. You do this once and then your index card is ready and you don’t have to add anything more. The proper study and recalling phase starts now:

  1. the next time I want to practice that specific still, I first take out my index card and start working with that. I first try to say the sentence in Chinese/Japanese out loud, then take a pace of scrap paper and write down the translation (this way, I also practice characters)
  2. I go on until I’ve translated all sentences on my card
  3. I fire Duolingo and check both translation and pronunciation

That’s basically it. As you can see is definitely nothing super long and complex, and it doesn’t require a lot of preparation. It usually takes me about 10/13 minutes to review a single skill using this system, but the retention rate is much much higher than simply using Duolingo on my phone or computer. This way I also feel a lot more engaged in the language and thus I enjoy myself much more while studying.

 

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Language learning at the beginning of the year

Word of the year or my LL approach is: relax. No rush, no pressure, no drama. I’m taking it easy.

I think that’s the only possible way for me to fit in both Chinese and Japanese in my schedule. If I try too hard with one language, I’ll end up by neglecting the other (and feel bad about it).Β  I find it easier to sneak in bits and pieces of both when I don’t put too much pressure on myself. So that will do for the moment.

In terms of resources, I’m mainly using my Duolingo + index cards system for both Chinese and Japanese. I should probably do a separate post about this, as for now it’s proving quite useful.

Sometimes I also try to read a few passages in Chinese from my Confucius class textbook, to keep my vocab fresh and get familiar with new grammar patterns. I’m not doing specific listening exercises at the moment, but I’ve been watching ζ²³η₯ž (Tientsin Mystic) more regularly lately and it feels like a good practice to get used to different accents and inflections.

Switching to Japanese, I’ve watched Flavours of Youth on Netflix – and I really liked it. This format is probably better for me to get back to the habit of watching anime, rather than having 27-episode long series to watch. I also like anime with a more mature storyline, I’m probably a bit too old for school dramas πŸ˜…

 

/All over the place kind of post/

 

 

Language learning in the festive season

I used to love the Christmas season as a child (well, even as an adult), but in the last couple of years it has started feeling more of a chore than a festive occasion – and this is something that really saddens me.

Living abroad makes things a little more difficult in these regard, with travels to visit family and everything, but still. It’s like something has shifted in my brain and I’m able to concentrate my attention only on certain things and not on others. Like not having enough me-time, or language learning-time.

So yeah, Christmas is never the most productive season in terms of language learning. I get a bit anxious when I can’t study Chinese for more than one day – I know, it’s silly, but I really value the habit of studying a little bit every day.

But at the same time I can’t bring myself to focus on studying when there’s so much going on around me. I need a little tranquillity in order to be able to retain information, and tranquillity and Christmas definitely don’t go well together πŸ˜…

When did things get so complicated?

Post HSK3 reflections

Of all the things the I was expecting to happen for HSK, arriving late at the test definitely wan’t one of them.

Oh. Well.

πŸ˜…

Considering that I’m never ever late (not for trains/planes, not for tests, not for doctor appointments, again, never), this feels even more ridiculous. There have been a number of factors working against me and all independent from my control – but anyway, this is what happened. Which means that I lost the first 10 questions of the listening part.

I lost more than that actually, because by the time I was sitting in the class I was so angry and dumbfounded that I found it very hard to focus on the ongoing audio track.

So, yeah. That didn’t go well.

I won’t deny it, I was extremely disappointed at how things turned out – I’ve been talking about taking HSK3 for almost two years now, and this definitely wasn’t the way I wanted it to unfold. It was supposed to be a rewarding and exciting experience, and it was not.

Anyway. I’ll get the score that I get, and move on. The significant other encouraged me to consider whether it could be worth taking it a second time, but regardless of the outcome I’ve decided against it. Right now I don’t have the right mindset to prepare for it again, and I’d rather focus on the next target than sulk over it.

So, drama and incidents apart. How was the test?

Well, I can say that I found it exactly the way I expected it to be – doable but still challenging. Reading was ok, characters ok, writing ok even though there was a sentence to reorder that caught me slightly off guard (something that never happened while I was doing the mock tests).

Listening was hard, and I’m not surprised. Partly because as I said I wasn’t exactly calm and focused enough for it, partly because listening is always difficult for me. I’ve improved a lot, this I can say, but there’s still a lot of work to do.

In general, HSK3 is where things start getting serious. By this time I think people start to decide whether they want to keep studying the language or not. Since there’s no pinyin in the paper and you also have to write characters, you either are in or out. I noticed a lot of improvements in my language level while studying for this test – 600 characters is not huge but they definitely can bring you much further than the 300 of HSK2.

Overall I enjoyed immensely studying for this test and, even if the experience has been a bit unfortunate this year, I absolutely haven’t lost my motivation in keep studying Chinese. I’m getting close to feel more confident with the language, and I love it even more than before. I’ve been preparing a HSK3 study resources blog post for quite some time now – I don’t know whether I’ll be able to complete it before new year since I’m quite busy these days, but in case you’re interested wait for it because it’s coming out sooner or later.

Next target now is HSK4 in 2 years time. I’ll take care of getting to the venue at least an hour earlier next time, that’s for sure!

HSK3 -1 day

So here we are. The day before the infamous test πŸ™‚

I feel pretty relaxed about it, mostly because I’ve been doing a few mock tests these last few days and I know exactly were I stand. I also know what I need to work more on from, like, Sunday onwards. Well, maybe not Sunday. I think I’m going to take a day off from Chinese this weekendΒ πŸ˜›

As I shared on Instagram, I decided not to overdo it today – there’s no point really, it’s not like you can become proficient if you cram everything in the last week before the exam. Plus I honestly don’t have any kind of pressure – it’s just something I do for fun, because I like it and I want a system to evaluate my progresses (especially now that I’m self studying).

I made a lot of mistakes in this almost 2 years of preparation but I’ve also learnt a lot from them and this is what matters the most to me. I’m definitely going to do better for HSK4, it still won’t be perfect, but definitely better πŸ™‚

There will be posts on the overall HSK3 experience and HSK resources for study and preparation in the upcoming days/weeks. December is always a busy busy month for us Christmas-celebrating people, but I’ll make sure to find the time anyway.

For all of you who are going to take HSK, TOPIK, JLPT or any other language test during this weekend/month: good luck!!

 

The future of my language learning after HSK3

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I haven’t even taken the test yet, but of course I’m here already planning and scheming on what to do next. It wouldn’t be me otherwise πŸ˜›

So, what happens after Saturday? Well, I’m going to take a little break, that’s for sure. I’m not going to stop studying languages because I know it would become super hard to pick them up again, but since I have a lot going on right now I feel like I need to take a step back and re-evaluate.

So, for Chinese. I don’t know what my performance with HSK3 will be of course, but I honestly doubt I’ll flunk it. Which means that the next target would be HSK4, which hopefully I’ll be able to prepare in two years (my plan would be to take it in December 2020, since this one would have been expired by then). Hopefully I’ve learnt enough from my mistakes this year and this would be doable πŸ˜…

This said, I want to take things a little bit further with my Chinese study. Ok textbooks and whatnot, but I also want to establish a more broad study practice and routine. I would especially like to start using the internet more, both as a source of listening and reading practice. It’s free, what more could I want from the universe?

Then, Japanese. I really, really want to start back seriously with it. I miss studying it and I’ve been feeling an increasing longing for it in the last couple of years, especially when I happen to stumble upon it (people talking down the street, ramen package instructions, dramas on Netflix and so on).

I don’t know yet how I’m going to manage studying two such intensive-labour languages at the same time – if there’s something I learnt this year is that studying takes time, a lot of time actually. I barely managed to find enough of it for Chinese, so it’s definitely going to be a challenge. But I feel motivated enough to do it.

I would probably have to change my overall attitude towards it – less ‘scholastic’ and more real-life and personal-interests prone. I have a huge variety of resources to use to make it more fun and interesting – I just need to be less strict and start enjoying myself (and the languages) more.

So no, I’m not going to study any languages on Sunday πŸ‘»Β but I’ll be back to it on Monday, you can be sure of that!

 

HSK3 impressions beforehand

I’ve been doing quite a few mock tests in preparation for next Saturday, and these are my first impressions / expectations on how the exam is going to be:

  1. listening. This remains the hardest part for me. I practiced quite a lot in the last few months (though maybe not in the most efficient way) and, yes, I can see a certain improvement – but it’s still the bit I feel less confident about. I’m usually able to catch the keywords within the dialogues, which allows me to pick the right answer most of the time, but I know I will have to work more on this skill in the future.
  2. reading. Doable, but a bit trickier than expected. I tend to slip in 2/3 stupid mistakes that could be totally avoidable if i just paid more attention to the question. Also, sometimes I find a word that wasn’t on the official word list – so I can just pray this doesn’t happen in the actual test.
  3. writing. Based on the exam drills I’ve practiced with so far, this seems to be the easiest part (it’s also the one that gives less points). The ‘reorganise the sentence’ exercise is usually pretty straightforward, and the characters you’re supposed to write by hand are among the easiest (but I still managed to write 运 instead of δΊ‘ the other day, ha!). Just hoping I won’t be asked to write 葑萄. That would be interesting.

 

So, overall I think I can pass this test without too much stress. Whether or not I’ll do it well, that’s another story. But right now I’m super impatient to get myself tested and see what my actual Chinese level is!

Chinese Summer Goals Review

 

Good news: during the months of August and September (so far) I’ll be following meticulously my summer study plan, and I’ve also tracked and evaluated my progresses in my planner.

Bad news: I’m behind on all accounts, meaning, I have completed not a single task on my list ._.

Breaking it down:

  1. finish one audio course: I completed the first round, which was listening to the first 15 tracks of Learn Chinese 888, and I’m about halfway through the second phase (reviewing the notes and transcript from the dialogues). I haven’t completed the third phase, which is listening to all the track a second time and see how much (if?) I’ve improved my comprehension.
  2. review all HSK 3 words and characters: about halfway through it. I started well and strong but then slowed down a lot. As usual, the first 200 characters are much easier to review than the following 400.
  3. finish studying all A2 grammar points on Chinese Grammar Wiki: this is the goal I failed the most at, I think I’m not even at a third of the process. It takes a lot of time and a lot of focus, and I realised I can’t deal with more than 3/4 grammar points a day.

Now, I’ve been in Italy during the last 10 days so I would had probably accomplished more if I had been home instead, but I still wouldn’t have completed everything on the list.

What is good about this is that it’s super helpful to realise how much I can actually get done in a week/month. Plus I’m super happy that, even if I didn’t complete it, I was able for once to follow a clear, goal-oriented study plan.

So now: today is the first day of fall (YAY!), and we’re also slightly more than 2 months away from the test. My plan is:

  • in this last 7 days of September, focus on finishing the listening course (notes and audio tracks) + the wordlist. I want to have all the characters reviewed thoroughly at least once and then keep them fresh until the exam;
  • from October 1st (marking exactly 2 months before HSK 3), start with a proper fall study plan – which will probably be divided in two (a plan for October and a plan for November). It will have its own post of course.

I’m still overall happy about the progresses I’m making, but time is passing fast and I need to start thinking about wrapping things up, which is kind of scary. It is also true that pressure can be a quite valid form of motivation πŸ˜…

 

Back home & the status of my Language Learning

It’s 7:10am and I’m sitting at my desk with a cup of steaming herbal tea and a blanket.

When we left Florence yesterday afternoon it was about 32 degrees Celsius. By the time we landed in Edinburgh, it was 8Β° with strong western winds and pounding rain. Ha!

Feels good to be home anyway.

While I was in Italy language learning wasn’t exactly my focus (stuffing my mouth with delicious fruits and veggies and seafood was – though for some reason I didn’t have a single ice cream 😟 NO. FREAKING. WAY.), but I haven’t let it slip away either. I’ve maintained my 189-day streak on Duolingo [kinda proud of it if I do say so myself] and I’ve also been fairly active on Instagram this time, which is something I don’t do for likes and followers but rather to keep myself accountable/inspired/motivated.

So this has been my study routine/attempt while I was away:

  1. as mentioned, I practiced Chinese Duolingo everyday. Sometimes I did just one lesson because I had too much of the rest going on, sometimes I managed to do 3 or four skills in a session. I found it to be a pretty useful resource for when I’m out and about and I don’t have either the time or the occasion to spread out dozens of notes and textbooks on my desk.
  2. for grammar and listening, I’ve re-started attending the HSK3 prep course on Coursera since I hadn’t finished it last time. I have to admit I’m already a week behind (πŸ˜…πŸ˜…πŸ˜…), but I was nice to have a quick and easily accessible resource like this for those few times I felt like having a bit more in-depth study session.
  3. I also found some time to have a look at Chinese resources in a big bookshop downtown. I know that this doesn’t technically count as study activity, but considering how much I love books in general, browsing bookstores it’s always a good motivation boost for me – so it does count in a way.
  4. unfortunately, I haven’t studied a single word of Japanese while I was away. Considering that I had limited time and limited resources, I consciously decided to give priority to Chinese (only 72 days to HSK3!!!). I expect that less and less time would be devoted to Japanese from now to the date of the test, but I have plans for it once I’m finally done with HSK3.

There are a lot of things I want to do and I’m excited about this fall. I want to intensify my commitment to language learning in general, starting with doubling efforts for Chinese. In a couple of days I’ll post about how my summer goals went, what I want to do next and my fall study schedule. My to do list for the day is quite long so I’m happy I took advantage of my habit of waking up before 6:30am to write this blog post πŸ™‚Β #earlybirdpride

(A kind of) Full Immersion Weekend

I honestly hadn’t planned to do another weekend of full immersion, but I ended up doing something of the sort anyway πŸ™ƒπŸ™ƒπŸ™ƒ

I didn’t use anything new in terms of resources, as it seems that my current study workflow of Duolingo + HSK3 wordlist review (and Anki) + listening practice on YouTube + Chinese grammar wiki is working pretty well for me at the moment.

I think what has changed a lot lately is that I’ve been feeling a lot more connected to the language and the culture in general. This is giving me a boost in motivation and commitment, and I actually enjoy immensely my study sessions, instead of feeling like they’re something I *have* to do (even if it’s just for myself).

The significant other and I are going to Italy tomorrow to visit family and friends and have a lot of good food, so my study routine will be inevitably slowed down a bit. I’ll do my best not to completely lose momentum, though I also think that sometimes is good to take a break and give our braincells the time to process information.

Plus I can always pay a visit to some bookstore in Florence, they often surprise me with juicy language learning related goodie.

I’m also thinking about the tons of gelato I’ll eat while home and I’m like awwwwwwwww 😍

*totally unrelated*

On other news, I’m currently watching the Netflix Korean drama Black. I’m at episode 5 right now and I’m slowly starting to get into it – though I’ve already picked up some flows (at least based on my tastes). I really enjoy the crime/mystery part and I find the male lead extremely captivating and fun – while on the other end the female lead’s story bores me to death ._.

I’m kind of sick of watching always the same drama with the same heroine who for some reason is hated by everyone in her life (I can think of at least other 3 dramas with similar situations, and I’ve not watched that many in total), and I’m also sick of the already-seen young and handsome heir who looks like an idol and who is the son of an illegitimate affair of the head of the house, so that the other siblings hate and despise him. All of this is a huge no-no for me, and I honestly wish they would have just decided to focus on the crime/mystery bit.

Anyway! It always feels good to surround myself with East Asian stuff, be it books or movies or dramas or textbooks (lol). Hope I can keep up the good work!